Monday, November 10, 2008

Duke University Hospital steals glasses, drugs and hurts/threatens elderly patients

Sometimes it is the para-professionals and support staff that take advantage of the patients. The poor treatment becomes systemic.

As my dad has been hospitalized with a very serious infection, the administration at Duke required that my dad have a "sitter."


DUKE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL "SITTER" OR OTHER EMPLOYEE STEALS MY DAD'S EXPENSIVE PRESCRIPTION EYEGLASSES AND ANTI-ANXIETY MEDICATION

That "sitter" helped feed dad dinner the first night. After the sitter left, my father's glasses and a partial prescription was missing.

I had to get dad a new pair of glasses. Duke nurses seemed indifferent that my dad had no glasses. The attitude was "who cares, he is just an sick, old man."

Even thought the "sitter" had the control and access to my father's glasses and tranquilizer pills while dad was bed bound and the "sitter" had free access to the room, Duke University Medical takes no responsibility.

DUKE UNIVERSITY HOSPITAL LEAVES MY FATHER IN FULL RESTRAINTS FOR MORE THAN TWO HOURS WITHOUT CHECKING ON HIM

In addition, I personally observed my dad in physical restraints for almost 2 hours with no supervision (other than me). God knows how long the restraints were on before I arrived.

NURSE "MONICA" THREATENS, MAYBE HITS AND WANTS TO RESTRAIN MY SICK DAD AS PUNISHMENT

In addition, I was outside dad's room as nurse "Monica" and a student nurse were inserting a foley cath in my dad. I heard a "slap" sound and then my dad yelled "don't hit me." I immediately opened the door. Before "Monica" could see who opened the door, "Monica" yelled "get restraints."

I told "Monica" to stop the procedure if it was causing my dad pain. And I told "Monica" that there will be no restraints. "Monica" told me that the cath was in and all was fine. My dad was calm. So why the call for restraints? Punishment?

Duke University Hospital takes no responsibility. Doesn't Duke get it? Duke messed up. Duke missed the significance of the infection at the area of a fused bone (with metal).

Dad would not be back in the hospital and risking amputation and six (6) months of rehab if Duke had not messed up.

North Carolina has "Sorry Works" legislation. It really does work, Duke.

Thank goodness that there are other agencies and commissions that care about patients and their safety. And I am off to talk with those that want to protect patients.

No comments:

Post a Comment